Depreciation Terms every residential investor needs to know

by | Mar 18, 2021

Depreciation terms every residential investor needs to know

Residential investors don’t need to be depreciation experts but understanding some of the key concepts surrounding this complex topic can help your ongoing investment strategy.

  1. Capital works deduction

This is the depreciation deduction you can claim on the structural component of the building and any fixed assets. Some common examples include walls, doors, roofing, sinks and built-in kitchen cabinetry.

Capital works deductions can be claimed under division 43 at a rate of 2.5 per cent for up to forty years on any residential property where construction commenced after 15 September 1987. But if a property is older than this and has undergone a structural renovation, such as retiling a kitchen, some capital works deductions will be available.

  1. Plant and equipment

This category of depreciation refers to the easily removable or mechanical fixtures and fittings in a property. Floor coverings, furniture and air-conditioning units are some examples of plant and equipment assets. Plant and equipment assets are depreciated under division 40.

Legislation changes mean that some owners of second-hand properties can’t claim depreciation on previously used plant and equipment assets.

  1. Effective life

Plant and equipment depreciation rates are calculated based on their effective lives. The Australian Taxation Office sets the relevant effective life of an asset.

  1. Diminishing value method

This is just one of the two methods of calculating depreciation for plant and equipment assets. When this method is chosen, the deduction is calculated as a percentage of the asset’s depreciable balance.

  1. Prime cost method

The second way to calculate plant and equipment depreciation is under this method. The deduction for each year is a percentage of the cost, resulting in a more even claim per financial year.

  1. Low-value pool

You can place plant and equipment assets that cost or are valued at less than $1,000 in a low-value pool. Once allocated to the pool, the asset is depreciated at an accelerated rate of 18.75 per cent in the first year and 37.5 per cent for each following year.

  1. Quantity surveyor

This is a professional specialising in building measurement and estimating construction costs. Under Tax Ruling 97/25, they are the few professionals that are qualified to accurately calculate construction costs for depreciation purposes.

  1. Substantial renovation

A substantial renovation differs from a cosmetic renovation as this is where all, or substantially all, of a building is removed or replaced. When a property is substantially renovated, previously used plant and equipment assets are no longer affected by 2017 legislation changes.

  1. Cosmetic renovation

Painting internal walls, replacing floor coverings and light fittings are just some examples of cosmetic renovations. They are usually visual in nature and are a more cost-effective option to structural renovations.

  1. Tax depreciation schedule

This is a schedule that lasts the lifetime of the property and specifies all available depreciation deductions of a building’s structure and its assets. The schedule fee is 100 per cent tax deductible.

For over twenty years, BMT Tax Depreciation has been preparing tax depreciation schedules for investors across Australia. On average, BMT find almost $9,000 in first full financial year deductions and always strive to find the maximum deductions for their clients. To learn more about BMT and the services they offer, Request a Quote or call the team on 1300 728 726.

Bradley Beer (B. Con. Mgt, AAIQS, MRICS, AVAA) is the Chief Executive Officer of BMT Tax Depreciation.  Please contact 1300 728 726 or visit bmtqs.com.au for  Australia-wide service.


General Advice Warning

The material on this page and on this website has been prepared for general information purposes only and not as specific advice to any particular person. Any advice contained on this page and on this website is General Advice and does not take into account any person’s particular investment objectives, financial situation and particular needs.

Before making an investment decision based on this advice you should consider, with or without the assistance of a securities adviser, whether it is appropriate to your particular investment needs, objectives and financial circumstances. In addition, the examples provided on this page and on this website are for illustrative purposes only.

Although every effort has been made to verify the accuracy of the information contained on this page and on this website, Chan & Naylor, its officers, representatives, employees, and agents disclaim all liability [except for any liability which by law cannot be excluded), for any error, inaccuracy in, or omission from the information contained in this website or any loss or damage suffered by any person directly or indirectly through relying on this information.

Chan & Naylor
Chan & Naylor

Chan & Naylor is Australia’s leading property, business, tax-accounting & wealth advisory group with offices nationwide.

The Chan & Naylor Group has national offices in South West Sydney, Sydney CBD, Pymble and Parramatta in New South Wales, Wheelers Hill, Melbourne and Moonee Ponds in Victoria, Brisbane in Queensland, and East Perth in Western Australia that can assist you with your accounting needs. Contact us here today.

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